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JUNE 1st, 2018

This year we offer post-Conference workshops. These full and half day events will provide an opportunity to work closely with local and national leaders in active learning. We limit registration to small groups (16-20 per workshop) to maximize attention and time with instructors.

Workshop Fees*

1 x Half-day workshop – $60
2 x Half-day workshops – $100
*Free for students

**NOTE: Recognizing that not all faculty have sufficient professional development funding, SALTISE has put aside a small reserve to offer mini-bursaries. Please contact info@saltise.ca if you would like to apply for this mini-bursary.

MORNING SESSIONS

(1.1) 9:00 – 12:00 | Interrupted case studies: Making problem-based learning accessible to the average classroom

(1.2) 9:00 – 12:00 | Enhanced Lightboard Studio: Producing effective videos to prepare students for learning (limited space)

(1.3) 9:00 – 12:00 | PeerWise and DALITE: How two platforms can make a difference in what your students learn before they come to class

(1.4) 9:00 – 13:00 | Success Strategies for New Faculty Members and their Mentors

 

AFTERNOON SESSIONS

(2.1) 13:00 – 16:00 | Expanding on PeerWise and DALITE: How these tools can support a STEM classroom (this workshop is essentially the same as the morning session)

(2.2) 13:00 – 16:00 | SALTISE Active Learning Web-Platform Resources: Authentic Active Learning Activities and Strategies for Every Classroom

(2.3) 13:00 – 16:00 | Disruption by Design: Promoting Authentic Learning & Student Engagement by Integrating Design Thinking and Improv Principles in Classrooms

 

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

MORNING SESSIONS

9:00 – 12:00 | Interrupted case studies: Making problem-based learning accessible to the average classroom

Leslie Schneider
Visual Classrooms
https://visualclassrooms.com/

Revait Masilamani
Center for Translational Science Education (CTSE), post-doctorate
Boston, Massachusetts
https://sites.tufts.edu/ctse/

This hands-on workshop will introduce participants to an innovative approach to active learning instruction.  Called “interrupted case studies” (ICS) it is a version of problem-based learning first developed for medical education (e.g. Riesbeck & Shank, 1989; Foran, 2001) and also business. ICS engages students within peer groups in solving carefully constructed “cases” (e.g., medical cases) that provide them with opportunities for analytical thinking and applications of concepts to real-world scenarios. We have advanced a structured model of case-based learning using “interrupted case studies” (ICS) that engages students in critical thinking skills such as the evaluation of evidence and arguments, interpretation of data, and claims evaluation. By structuring cases into a clear progression, we provide “interruption points” that allow teams of students to stay in sync, and give instructors an opportunity for planned or spontaneous whole-class discussions. This iterative format also allows teachers multiple opportunities to pose questions, review student responses, and to use those responses to address student misconceptions and model answering questions appropriately (Herreid, 2005). In this way, ICS comprises an iterative set of phases:

  1. Exploration phase – student groups are presented with partial information / data that sets the foundation for a legitimate scientific problem. They then work collaboratively to discuss the information and devise a solution to address the problem.  In this phase, the teacher takes on the role of ‘guide at the side’.
  2. Discourse phase – in this phase the teacher takes on the role of ‘mentor at the center,’ orchestrating class-wide student discourse while, modeling the process of scientific argumentation.
  3. Synthesis phase – in this phase, the teacher reprises their ‘guide at the side’ role as students return to their groups to synthesize findings and formulate a final solution to the initial question. The next segment of the case is then revealed to them and they repeat the next iteration of the three phases of the ICS.

This workshop will present and engage participants in two interrupted cases – one short 45-minute paper-based case and a condensed version of a longer technology-enhanced case.  Participants will also learn how to build their own interrupted case studies.

Intended audience:

This half day (3 hour) workshop is intended for instructors (college and university) interested in using case studies to promote their students understanding of ill-structured authentic problems and deeper learning.

 

9:00 – 12:00 | Enhanced Lightboard Studio: Producing effective videos to prepare students for learning

Prof. Christopher Moraes
Gerald W. Farnell Teaching Scholar in Engineering; Dept. of Chemical Engineering, McGill University

Ms. Kimberley Desrochers
eLATE funded Research Assistant
http://mcgill.ca/engineering/initiatives/elate

Understanding foundational facts, concepts, and procedures are a prerequisite to engaging in any higher levels of learning. Instructors are under considerable pressure to balance their responsibilities to cover the syllabi and introduce in-class active learning experiences. Successful adoption of active learning approaches therefore requires a  reformulation of how foundational content might be made available to students.

Short online instructional videos can be an effective educational tool and when designed correctly, can be more useful than recorded lectures. This workshop will share the process of recording videos using the McGIll Lightboard studio, and will leverage what has been learned about designing effective instructional videos, from the data analytics collected.  Additionally, its use offers a solution for a critical shortcoming of Flipped Classroom approaches, in which time-pressured students often do not prepare for lectures in advance.

The Lightboard, is a glass chalkboard that allows presenters to face the camera, conduct demonstrations, speak and write simultaneously. The presenters’ writing glows in front of them, with no editing or post-processing required. Working a chalkboard is a commonly used lecture technique that limits the pace of information delivery, allows for responsive and interactive discussion, and instructors can use effective board layouts to connect previous concepts in concretely visible terms. The Lightboard has been paired with a “One Button Studio”, which allows instructors to walk in, record videos and walk out with their video on a USB drive ready to upload to a server.

What will be shared during this workshop:

The workshop will be led by Ms. Kimberley Desrochers, an eLATE funded Research Assistant, who is currently studying Lightboard use and practice. Participants will have the opportunity to use the Lightboard facility, and working in small groups, produce a short video, and obtain feedback and guidelines on making an effective instructional video presentation.

If time permits, there will be a discussion of the data obtained through Youtube Analytics that monitors students’ viewing statistics (e.g., unique/repeated views, most viewed portion of the video).

Intended audience:

This is a half day (3 hour) workshop is intended for college and university faculty, and teaching assistants (TAs), particularly in STEM disciplines, interested in making videos to support a Flipped Classroom approach and learning how the data from the YouTube analytics can be an integral part of improving the effectiveness of these materials.

 

9:00 – 12:00 | PeerWise and DALITE: How two platforms can make a difference in what your students learn before they come to class

Paul Denny
Associate Professor of Computer Science, University of Auckland, New Zealand
https://peerwise.cs.auckland.ac.nz/

Sameer Bhatnagar & Yann Brouillette
Dawson College
https://www.saltise.ca/projects/mydalite/

This workshop will introduce participants to two powerful on-line tools for active learning: PeerWise and myDalite. The workshop will be hands-on and by the end of the session, participants will have set up accounts in both platforms, created content in both platforms and tried the system out enough that they are comfortable using both in their courses next fall.

Peerwise is an award-winning, freely available web-based tool that allows students to create, answer and assess multiple-choice questions for their peers based on the related content. PeerWise enables students to engage in the types of cognitive processes that align with the highest levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Additionally, it provides teachers with a unique glimpse into what students are thinking and what they believe are important and effective questions for the course. It can be used to support collaborative student learning across a wide range of disciplines. Peerwise is gaining much attention with more than half a million students in 80 countries. Peerwise is also backed by evidence from a global community of educational researchers that demonstrates its potential for significant positive impact on learning.

myDALITE, is an asynchronous Peer Instruction platform, also a freely available web-based tool, that supports deep learning. The pedagogical foundations of myDALITE are built on important learning principles and practical know-how of the Peer Instruction strategy, popularized by Eric Mazur. That is, a strategy that involves a sequence of steps that promote deep thinking and discussion around the selection of the answers for multiple choice conceptual questions – i.e., think-vote-discuss- reflect- revote. myDALITE has been in development as a research tool for several years and it is currently being developed as a full-fledged tool for instructors. With a new user interface, new features and a robust system of analytics and assignment building features it is ready for prime-time.

Intended audience:

This half day (3 hours) morning workshop is intended for instructors and teaching assistants interested in using collaborative peer instruction as homework or to provide students with more practice outside of class time. Additionally, Peerwise and myDALITE are ideally suited for a Flipped Classroom approach.

 

9:00 – 13:00 | Success Strategies for New Faculty Members and their Mentors

Rebecca Brent
President, Education Designs, Inc.
Chapel Hill, NC
educationdesignsinc.com

Richard M. Felder
Hoechst Celanese Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering
North Carolina State University
www.ncsu.edu/effective_teaching

College teaching may be the only skilled profession for which no preparation or training is provided or required. You get a graduate degree and join a faculty, they welcome you and show you your office, and then tell you “By the way, you’re teaching 205 and 427 next semester. See you later.” If you’re at a university that expects its faculty to do research, they also tell you that they expect you to have a million or two dollars in funding and a dozen publications in top journals in your first one or two years. And so most new faculty members end up learning their craft by trial-and-error, a process that generally takes years to complete, and some never manage to learn it.

There are better ways to prepare new faculty members to succeed. This interactive workshop addresses these questions:

  • What are the four common mistakes 95% of new faculty members commit that make them take 4–5 years to meet or exceed their institution’s expectations of research productivity and teaching effectiveness? How do the other 5% (the “quick starters”) avoid the mistakes and knock three years off their learning curves in both research and teaching?
  • How can new (and experienced) faculty members prepare and deliver effective courses with plenty of student engagement (active learning) while still having time for the rest of their lives?
  • How can faculty members write proposals, papers, books, and (for future faculty members) dissertations and get them finished in a reasonable time?
  • How can new faculty members get mentoring that accelerates their progress toward promotion and tenure? What mentoring strategies have been found effective?

Intended audience:

This half day (4 hour) morning workshop is intended for new faculty, particularly at the university level.

 


 

AFTERNOON SESSIONS

13:00 – 16:00 | Expanding on PeerWise and DALITE: How these tools can support a STEM classroom (this workshop is essentially the same as the morning session)

Paul Denny
Associate Professor of Computer Science, University of Auckland, New Zealand
https://peerwise.cs.auckland.ac.nz/

Sameer Bhatnagar & Yann Brouillette
Dawson College
https://www.saltise.ca/projects/mydalite/

This workshop will focus specifically on how PeerWise and myDALITE can be used within a STEM (Science Technology Engineering & Math) classroom. Similar to the morning session, this workshop will be hands-on and by the end of the afternoon, participants will have set up accounts in both platforms, created content in both platforms and tried the system out enough that they are comfortable using both in their courses next fall.

Intended audience:

This half day (3 hour) afternoon workshop is intended specifically for STEM instructors and will focus on issues of using these tools for promote conceptual change.

 

13:00 – 16:00 | SALTISE Active Learning Web-Platform Resources: Authentic Active Learning Activities and Strategies for Every Classroom

SSHRC-Connections group & S4
Jeremie Choquette, Veronique Brulé & Meghan Marshall
https://www.saltise.ca/resources/

This workshop will explore set of innovative resources developed by a research-practice initiative – i.e., the SALTISE web-platform. This resource brings together authentic Active Learning Activities, developed by real college and university instructors, with a new framework for examining and sharing the pedagogical structure that features known instructional principles or Strategies that promote learning, often involving group work and collaboration. The workshop will feature the framework developed by this research-practice team to document the AL Activities and it will show how it can be used to support the creation of new AL materials.

Specifically, the workshop will provide participants with opportunities to: (1) use the Strategies to understand how to use existing Activities; (2) how to build new activities of their own; and (3) how to document their own existing activities so they can be shared on the SALTISE web-platform. Time for discussion and comparison of activities will be provided.

This workshop will be given by members of the research-practice team (graduate students & senior educational researchers) who have been documenting the SALTISE web-platform Activities.

Intended audience:

This half-day (3hour) workshop is intended for college and university instructors who are interested in trying active learning approaches in their classrooms. In particular, new faculty who are looking to develop course materials based on tried and effective strategies will benefit from this session.

Additional audience: graduate students or teaching assistants (TAs), interested in teaching at the college level. It is an opportunity to learn about pedagogy and lesson design, meet college faculty and work alongside them to develop active learning materials.

 

13:00 – 16:00 | Disruption by Design: Promoting Authentic Learning & Student Engagement by Integrating Design Thinking and Improv Principles in Classrooms

Joan Butterworth
McGill University’s Leadership Development and Engagement in Campus Life & Engagement/Student Services
Email: joan.butterworth@mcgill.ca

Tannia Ditchburn
English and Drama Educator, Lester B. Pearson School Board
Email: tditchburn@lbpearson.ca

This interactive workshop will help instructors develop new teaching strategies and tools to cultivate a student-centered and engaging learning environment. By applying the principles of both design thinking and improv, learning becomes more collaborative, solution-focused, relevant and meaningful.

There are many parallels between improv and design thinking. Improv empowers people to practice their skills of teamwork, positivity, active listening, embracing the unexpected and risk taking. It encourages one to break out of patterns of behaviour and thinking and become open to new information and input from others. Design thinking is human-centered, experimental, optimistic, solution-focused and collaborative; it allows students to apply and expand their academic learning to authentic contexts. Like improv, design thinking requires healthy team dynamics, innovative thinking, creative brainstorming, experimentation and reflection. By combining and integrating these processes, you can create learning experiences that are more impactful, productive and motivating for students and teachers alike.

This workshop will engage participants in a series of exercises that teach design thinking and improv basics. Participants will learn how these principles can transform the learning environment and empower students to demonstrate their learning in ways that offer real world applications.

Participants will leave with (1) knowledge of design thinking and improv principles (2) specific teaching strategies that can be incorporated into the classroom context (3) concrete practical applications by discipline.

Intended audience:
This half-day (3 hour) workshop is designed for college and university instructors who are interested in exploring innovative instructional methods that encourage students to more fully engage in the classroom. Graduate students or teaching assistants (TAs) are also most welcome.

 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER